The Open Championship 2020 Betting Guide – All You Need to Know

Known simply as the Open Championship, this event is the British hosted major on the PGA and European Tours and organised by the R&A. It is also the oldest professional golf tournament in the world making it one of the most prestigious and perfect for engaging in some open championship betting!

Best Betting Sites we Recommend for The Open Championship Betting

#1
bet365
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#2
Paddy Power
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William Hill
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#4
Coral
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#5
Ladbrokes
  • Major golf bookmakers
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18+ New UK+IRE customers. Paypal and certain deposit types and bet types excluded. Min £5 bet within 14 days of account reg at min odds 1/2 = 4 x £5 free bets. Free bets valid for 4 days on sports, stake not returned, restrictions apply. T&Cs apply.

 

The Open Championship 2020 Betting – Tips and Odds Update

the open championship betting

(Image: Sergio Garcia at The Open | © Steven Newton | Licence: CC BY 2.0)

The R&A have announced that, due to the current Covid-19 pandemic, the 149th Open, due to be held in Kent from 12-19 July, has been cancelled for 2020 and will now be played at Royal St George's in July 2021.

 

Popular Bets for The Open Championship

Betting on golf hugely popular with many punters. With huge fields of 156 and unique weather conditions, sometimes at least, the Open Championship is one of the toughest tournaments to win, regardless of which British links course is hosting. All the usual betting markets will be open for The Open, including the following:

Open Championship Winner

Who will win the Claret Jug and follow in the footsteps of the likes of Rory McIlroy, Jordan Spieth and Francesco Molinari? This bet sees you making your best guess at answering that question and backing it up with a suitable stake. If your bet is correct, then you will have made a profit.

Top Performing Player From a Nation

With this bet, punters are required to place a bet on who they think will be the highest performing player from any nominated country: England, Italy, Spain and so on. As long as your player outperforms his compatriots, you’re in the money.

Two-Ball Betting

With two-ball betting, players are grouped off into pairs and your bet aims to pick which of the two will have the better tournament. If your pick fares better than his rival, then your bet pays out as a winner.

Hole-in-One

This is a bet where absolutely any participating golfer in the field needs to get the ball into the hole in one solitary shot. The hole-in-one can be scored by anyone at any time over the course of a tournament, and as such is exceptionally rare. In truth, it’s far more likely that there will be no hole-in-one score, and you can bet on this particular instance too. The last hole-in-one scored at The Open was in 2016 by Louis Oosthuizen.

Tournament Structure for The Open Championship

The tournament sees a field of 156 golfers take on a typical 72 hole stroke play tournament over four days of play, during which 18 holes are played on each day, weather permitting. The event usually gets underway on the third Thursday in July each year, finishing on the Sunday. After Friday’s session has been concluded and 36 holes have been played, only the top 70 players will continue to participate in proceedings and play the final 36 holes. By the end of play on Sunday, the player with the biggest below par score will become the Open Champion winner and is handed the Claret Jug. If, however, there is a tie for the lead after 72 holes, a three-hole aggregate playoff is held which can, if necessary, be followed by sudden death if a winner still cannot be established.

History of The Open Championship

The Open Championship is the oldest of all four major championships in professional golf, and was first played on October 17, 1860 at Prestwick Golf Club in Scotland. The Open is administered by the R&A, the governing body of golf outside North America. The tournament is held every year on one of ten links courses in the UK. The Open Championship has taken place in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, but never Wales – although this will likely change soon as the R&A, who appoint the host of the championship around three years in advance, suggest it might. In 1873, The Claret Jug replaced the Challenge Belt as the physical prize and has been awarded to the winner each year since.

Past Winners of The Open Championship

YearChampionNationality
2019Shane LowryIreland
2018Francesco MolinariItaly
2017Jordan SpiethUnited States
2016Henrik StensonSweden
2015Zach JohnsonUnited States
2014Rory McIlroyNorthern Ireland
2013Phil MickelsonUnited States
2012Ernie ElsSouth Africa
2011Darren ClarkeNorthern Ireland
2010Louis OosthuizenSouth Africa
2009Stewart CinkUnited States
2008Pádraig HarringtonIreland
2007Pádraig HarringtonIreland
2006Tiger WoodsUnited States
2005Tiger WoodsUnited States
2004Todd HamiltonUnited States
2003Ben CurtisUnited States
2002Ernie ElsSouth Africa
2001David DuvalUnited States
2000Tiger WoodsUnited States

The Open Championship Key Stats

  • The oldest ever Open champion is Old Tom Morris, who won in 1867 aged 46 years, 102 days.
  • His son, Young Tom Morris, was 17 years and 156 days when he won in 1868, making him the youngest ever Open champion.
  • Young Tom also has the most consecutive victories after winning the Open in 1868 through 1872.
  • His dad, Tom Senior, holds the record for the greatest margin of victory when he won the 1862 event by 13 strokes.
  • With six wins here, Harry Vardon has won this event more than anyone else.
  • Jack Nicklaus has been an Open runner up a record six times.

 

FAQs

🎁  When does The Open Championship take place?

The Open Championship takes place in the third week and weekend of July each year. The 2020 edition of the tournament has been cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

🏆  How much is the prize pool for The Open Championship?

The prize fund is worth a total $10.75 million, which is about £8.6 million UK, with the winner’s cut at around $1.94 million or £1.56 million UK.

✋  What is the weather normally like for The Open?

That is hard to answer because the event takes place in a different British venue each year. But, on the whole, the UK gets a typical north European climate and July is often the hottest month, if a little rainy on the whole.

🙋  Can I bet on making the cut at The Open?

Yes - the cut is enforced on the Friday and you can bet on who makes it.

🤔  Can I bet on the winning nationality?

Yes, bookmakers take bets on the nationality of the winner.

 

ThePuntersPage Final Say

The Open is the fourth and final major tournament of the year following the US Masters, the PGA Championship and the US Open in the calendar. The tournament traditionally takes place over four days in summer, starting before the third weekend in July. The tournament has no fixed host venue and instead tours the United Kingdom, stopping in a new venue each year.

The tournament's Scottish heritage has helped it become one of the most treasured stops in Tour golf. Who can forget iconic images of Scottish rough and windswept North Sea shores taking on the likes of Seve Ballesteros, Jack Nicklaus and Nick Faldo? A far cry from the lush manicured lawns of Augusta. Although the weather is normally settled for the Open, such images are what make this tournament so special.